Paper or Plastic? Or…Boxes?

“Please stop throwing away the bags.” Karen asked for the second day in a row as the bag hit the bottom of the trash can. I normally store my lunch in what has come to be known as “Wal-Mart” bags and toss it after emptying the contents of plastic containers that held whatever leftovers we had from the night before.

minion-plastic

“Why?” I thought with confusion in the five seconds it took her to answer the question right after I had thought it.

“We don’t go to Wal-Mart any more.”

This is not a post railing against Wal-Mart or any other big chain retail or grocery store. They have their place in our life, but they don’t have it as often as they used to. I remember one Saturday complaining to my wife that it seemed like we had just been to the same store the day before. Shortly after we realized we had actually been to that same store for something nearly every day that week!

After my family woke up and realized the way we spent money, groceries were automatically an area we began looking at closer. I have to give credit to my frugal wife, she is the one who took charge of this area of our lives and is doing an excellent job. These are a few observations I’ve noticed since we started to live differently:

Budget for groceries

Make an amount that should be spent on groceries, now according to Dave Ramsey, double it. We spend way more than we think we do. Once that’s set, start planning.

Plan a trip once a week

Don’t underestimate this point. Gas isn’t cheap. Whenever we are making a single trip to the store, we are hit with a double whammy. The money we are going to give some merchant for whatever item we happen to make the trip for, and the gas we are spending to get to and from the store. If we go more than once, it’s multiplied. Right now gas is about $1.85 a gallon on average here in OK. My wife and I live 6 miles away from our local Wal-Mart, her car gets roughly 24 miles to the gallon. Say we make two trips a week to buy groceries and what not; that is 12 miles each trip, so if we go 2 trips, we are spending 1 gallon of gas, minimum. Multiply that by 52 weeks in a year and we’ve spent the same amount we would in the store alone on one trip, $96.20. Doesn’t sound like much huh? Remember, this is JUST to go to the store, not to a ball game, not to drive to work, or any other fun family function. It’s even better if it can be planned on the way home from work.

Make a grocery list BEFORE going to the store

One would think this goes without saying, but we won’t. Think before leaving. Write down the days of the week, think about eating for each meal, each day. Put together a menu. Once the menu is built, buy the ingredients needed for it.

Combine ingredients across different meals to save extra.

For instance: This week, I’m eating oatmeal for breakfast. I am forcing myself, because high cholesterol dictates this. I will also be eating chicken of some sort at least twice this week, so I buy a big flat of it, to make sure that there is enough for myself, Karen, and left over for our lunches. Sandwiches are a good cheap meal: bread, lunch meat, cheese, mustard, veggies to go on sandwich. How about some beans? Good fiber! Yes, write it down. Need stuff for kids? Pizza, cookies, fruit, or how about they just eat what we eat? Got it all wrote down? Let’s go!

Try some place different

Do some research about discount grocery stores, there may be one near that will help save a bundle. According to Money & Career Cheat Sheet, here are a few of the more affordable stores across the nation. Incidentally, we love Aldi’s. It’s in the next town over, but it’s well worth the gas spent (or saved because we planned accordingly). I just had a friend exclaim how she’s going to Aldi’s today, she’s heard too much good about it. Sure, patrons have to bag (or box) their own groceries, but it makes grocery shopping affordable. It’s good for the environment too. We use Aldi’s own boxes to put our groceries in, rather than them crushing them and sending to a recycler. No plastic bags for me to throw into the bottom of the trash can and then go to a landfill because I’m not thinking when I come from home from work.

'That's Jeb Lambert. He was actually the first one to say 'paper or plastic'. Before that everyone said 'plastic or paper'... I mean, can you imagine?'

 

Eat what is bought

Again, this should go without saying; but I can’t count how many times we have bought good, wholesome groceries and they rotted in the fruit or vegetable crisper while we went on a fast food bonanza. Lately our refrigerator looks naked just before a trip to the store. One would think we aren’t making it, but we are, we are just controlling ourselves. Babies aren’t starving, the boys are fine, and K and I might be losing weight because we are making wiser decisions without going to the local Sling-A-Bean Burrito Shack.

Take advantage of discount coupons

Okay, I was going to try to go without mentioning coupon clipping, but I would be lying to say we haven’t had a cheeseburger or pizza every now and again. The only time we buy them, though, is when Karen gets a fancy coupon the store can redeem on her smart phone through email. It comes in handy in a pinch, but a pinch only comes once a week, and it’s BUDGETED.

Finally, give this a TRY. If it gets screwed up, so what? Try again. Savings will come but don’t give up! It’s food, we have to eat, but we don’t have to eat from stores that think they are monopolies. Save gas and coupons, save money by not bingeing because a grocery list was made, and relax. Everything’s going to be fine. Me and mine are out to prove it.

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Just One More Level…(okay, maybe one more)

“Don’t waste your time chasing things that will never be beneficial to your future.”

April Mae Monterrosa

I used to consider myself a gamer. I love RPG (roll playing games) like the Final Fantasy series or The Legend of Zelda. Knowing this, my wife purchased “Twilight Princess” for Playstation 4 for me for Christmas one year. I thought it was a great gift, finally a game for Dad! I began playing immediately and was automatically hooked. Graphics were great, controls were easy to use, and the story line was exhilarating.

It was also LONG. I played this game every night for two to three weeks until victory was finally mine. The end of the game is always satisfying when it’s been challenging, and I considered that game formidable. I watched the cut scenes glassy eyed, satisfied with the long, hard, magical quest that Nintendo had programmed just for me and considered myself quite the champion. I could sleep knowing all was well with the world. Until….

Programmed into the game is also a timer to tell a gamer how long it took play to the end. Much to my surprise, my time came to a whopping FORTY HOURS! Reality suddenly started crashing down around me. I couldn’t believe it. An entire work week was spent after I got home from my real job to play a fantasy game that was both entertaining and fun, but didn’t change my life in the slightest. There was no education, no Bible reading, no growing closer to my wife and kids by acknowledging they exist, no contributing to the common good of man; it was just a bunch of pixels on a screen which fed some chemical high I had at the time. I don’t think I’ve played video games in quite the same way since.

I started this journey, by taking the time to look at my budget, and it revealed a couple of areas where I needed to spend some extra time. I was able to see exactly what my monthly costs were individually. Cell phones and car insurance were crazy high at $173 and $228 per month respectively. I needed to lower those numbers and I’ve covered cell phone charges in a previous post.

On to a different insurance broker to get a new rate quote on car insurance to save some money (I realize how much that sounds like a Geiko or Progressive commercial). All I needed was a declaration statement from my current provider to send to those providing the quote. Once it was sent, I was glad I did, because I found a local business that provided a quote that will save me not only $500 on my car insurance per year, but another $100 on my mortgage insurance per year (with more coverage). That’s an extra 50 bucks a month in my pocket! Changes will be made as soon as possible.

Most people, when they see their expenses monthly, simply see a number that is going to decrease their income and whatever is left is considered “mad money.” Money they can just spend. They’ve done their due diligence once, and maybe at one point in life the costs to do business to comply with the law, like car insurance, is acceptable to pay, so they do so happily, and that’s great. Then years slip by, as masses of people are being entertained, or chasing some high, like me, before they realize that there’s other companies out there that might give them a better deal.

Successful businesses understand time is money. Why can’t we as individuals? Every single day, countless numbers of people are zoning out through watching television, playing video games, trolling social media and not paying attention to what time it is, or how much time they’ve spent being entertained, rather than expanding their minds or doing something more productive. Turn off the TV. Make a budget. Call another company. You might be glad you did.

Staying Sane Through Saving

One of the problems in life is the perpetuity of it. We all have routines. Those who brush their teeth twice a day will continue to do so twice a day. If you chew with your mouth open when you eat, chances are it will take an act of God to keep you from noshing with annoying noises. Non-morning people have a hard time getting happy before 9 am, while morning people can’t stop annoying non-morning people. The circle of life seems to spin at a dizzying rate, while we continue to do the same things we’ve always done day in and day out. It takes conscious effort to change.

Karen and I woke up to this fact. It took emergencies to kick us in the butt and realize that one more and we were down to zero. So we changed our mind about the way we spend money on not only non-essentials, but also the essentials. It was time to trim any fat hanging out, and there seems to be plenty. An emergency won’t look so forlorn while trying to do something different. Doing the same things over and over got us into this mess, so we started looking at bills that didn’t have to be the same over and over.

Gas: it’s been the bane of anyone who has a forty-five minute to an hour commute or longer every day since 9/11. There just doesn’t seem to be any getting out of spending the same amount of money on gas week after week if you commute quite a distance between home and work. Or is there? Better gas mileage is what I need!

Many of us start thinking more efficient gas mileage means getting an oil change, or maybe a new car! It’s crazy how we can justify it, but we do. For some reason people think getting a new fuel-efficient car justifies the car payment; as if the $60 savings in gas every month will eventually pay the $230 car payment every month, but it doesn’t..the math doesn’t work. That’s probably an entry for another day.


Why not cut the gas mileage in half on a car I already own by car pooling with someone in my neighborhood? I’m not sure why I’ve never taken the idea seriously before, but I haven’t. “I don’t want to bug anyone.” I think to myself. FYI, if any readers out there want to bug me by telling me they can help me save $720 a year, feel free. By the way, that’s a calculation I figure I will be saving carpooling between me and my sister-in-law, who works across the parking lot from my office. I literally can throw a rock and hit her office window from the parking lot. We both need extra money, she gets off the same time I do almost every day and it helps take a whole extra car off the road (for all you environmentalists out there). I had to think really hard to find a reason NOT to car pool. I have to get up a little earlier, but I probably should be anyway. I’m one of those non-morning people.

Next up, phone prices. Yeah, if you have AT&T or Vorizon, you know what I’m talking about. They have good service, but they’re proud of it, and you’re paying for it. When my phone bill is higher than some car payments I’ve had in my life, there’s a problem. So my wife and I looked at some of that precious data and decided that we would be able to get by on 2 GB less. Shared data of 3 GB for us will save about 20 bucks. Since AT&T have put out a new promotion for no more overage charges, we are happy to let them help! So, multiply that by 12 months and we’ll have saved about $240.

Between the two, I’m looking to save almost $1000. This will meet the first of Dave Ramsey’s baby steps for us. Have a thousand dollars for emergencies. It will mean scraping up and NOT SPENDING the amount that we save, but it will be there. I’m starting to get used to the idea that it will take a while, but I also know that it will be here before I expect it, because good behaviors like this will compound and have ripple effects. It won’t just be all the money we save, but the integrity we receive by continuing the fight this fight. To some, $1000 isn’t much, but for those who feel we are sacrificing our privacy on a ride after a long day, or a few pictures or videos of our favorite media, for normal people – like my wife and I, it will be well worth the saving.